Hepatitis B

Hepatitis B Travel Vaccine

According to the World Health Organisation, approximately 600,000 people die every year as a result of hepatitis B. The hepatitis B vaccine is 95% effective in preventing infection and its chronic consequences.

Immunisation requires three individual doses, administered by injection. The second injection is given 4 weeks after the first and the third injection needs to follow 5 months later. 

Healthcare workers are advised to carry out a blood test after the immunisation is completed, to check whether the vaccination was successful. Travellers are at a lower risk of contracting hepatitis B and do not require a blood test. 

Once you have completed the whole course, you are protected for 5 years. 

The hepatitis B vaccine can cause mild side effects, such as redness and soreness at the injection site. Occasionally, patients feel tired within the first few days after the injection.

Hepatitis B is a type of hepatitis, a viral infection which can cause damage to the liver. Unlike hepatitis A, the hepatitis B virus is not usually transmitted via contaminated water but rather from person to person. It is often passed during sex or when using contaminated needles and medical equipment. Hepatitis B has a long incubation period of 30 - 180 days and is often symptomless. 

Possible hepatitis B symptoms are feeling or being sick, tiredness and headache as well as flu-like symptoms. Some patients also develop a yellowing of skin and eyes, which is called jaundice. The infection can persist for a long time and become chronic hepatitis B, resulting in liver damage and failure. 

If you are travelling to an area where hepatitis B is a common illness, you require a hepatitis B vaccine. The same goes for healthcare workers and medical professionals, who are more likely to be exposed to the infection.

Hepatitis B is a type of hepatitis, a viral infection which can cause damage to the liver. Unlike hepatitis A, the hepatitis B virus is not usually transmitted via contaminated water but rather from person to person. It is often passed during sex or when using contaminated needles and medical equipment. Hepatitis B has a long incubation period of 30 - 180 days and is often symptomless. 

Possible hepatitis B symptoms are feeling or being sick, tiredness and headache as well as flu-like symptoms. Some patients also develop a yellowing of skin and eyes, which is called jaundice. The infection can persist for a long time and become chronic hepatitis B, resulting in liver damage and failure. 

If you are travelling to an area where hepatitis B is a common illness, you require a hepatitis B vaccine. The same goes for healthcare workers and medical professionals, who are more likely to be exposed to the infection.

Travellers are particularly at risk if they have an accident and require medical treatment in a country with a high incidence of hepatitis B and a health care system with limited resources. In these circumstances, injections might be re-used or blood transfusions may not be screened for hep B. The hepatitis B vaccine prevents infection and protects you in case of such an emergency. 

Hepatitis B is also transmitted during sexual intercourse. If you have sexual intercourse during your travels, always ensure you use a condom to prevent transmission. Avoid procedures which involve piercing your skin, such as tattooing and acupuncture.

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